Today Covington released an updated version of its manual for Chiefs of Staff to Members of Congress concerning best practices for responding to government investigations of Members and their staff.  Titled “A How-To Guide for Chiefs of Staff,” the manual describes how government investigations of Members and staff unfold and the steps that Chiefs of

National Journal reported today that the House Ethics Committee quietly scrapped “decades of precedent” requiring Members of the House of Representatives and certain senior staff to disclose privately funded travel on annual financial disclosure forms.

Despite this change, travel costs still must be disclosed.  Under the current House travel rules, Members of the House and

Last week, the Office of Government Ethics (OGE) issued a memorandum with a reminder about executive branch ethics rules governing holiday gifts and fundraising.  There is nothing unusual about guidance like this—late last month, for example, the House Ethics Committee issued one for House members and staff—but OGE’s guidance stands out for its poetic formulation:

The House Committee on Ethics has issued two memoranda—one to Members and officers and the other to staff—detailing the restrictions placed on these individuals when negotiating future employment and entering the private workforce.  While this guidance is directed to those within the House of Representatives, it provides a useful description of the issues private